Most of my research is in the astro department but maybe they're willing to take recommendations from people in other departments?

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And do most of them require advanced GREs or not? Thus they can only support a few, top students.

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In my opinion I think pure math, econ, and certain humanities programs (i.e Philosophy) are the toughest for admissions, followed by CS and Physics, followed by other natural sciences, followed by softer sciences and interdisciplinary fields.

. Note: Click on column header to sort. Applicants are required to complete Subjects Taken section of the online application. Some of us learn faster when we actually do things analytically, rather than when we memorize things. The Harvard Physics PhD program will not be accepting Physics or General GRE scores for the upcoming admissions cycle with application deadline December 15, 2020. Some students may have to wait for another application cycle because they don't get into any programs the first time, for whatever reasons.

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I've looked into cognitive science PhD programs, and the top ones are still amazingly hard to get into (based on what someone from reddit says). This is definitely true in the most theoretical fields.

(Also, fewer professors!) Please do not submit GRE scores to us or mention them anywhere in your application. In general:

. It is incredibly easy to get an undergrad research position if you want to do mathematical biology for example, or the more theoretical parts of any other science.

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Theoretical disciplines receive less funding, therefore they cannot support as many students. [quote] If someone does poorly on it, they can EASILY improve their application by taking a gap year so that they could take it the next year.

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hmm they had good GREs.    |    Good point about students needing to demonstrate enormous capability too. I am curious as to where you get your information on Computational Biology and other related fields being easy to get into... these fields are actually very hot right now and extremely fast growing. Or a program in chemistry, or a softer science? Meanwhile, some top level physics and astrophysics departments DO have surprisingly high acceptance rates of over 25% (and these departments are the only ones where I can get reliable acceptance rates since a lot of them post them at gradschoolshopper.com). MIT’s acceptance rate in 2018 was 6.6%. Residency training is the most popular initial placement for both MS and PhD students. Note that this new policy may not be reflected on all Harvard University websites yet.

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Then go through the biosciences chances site. I'm especially interested in systems biology, biophysics, and computational biology. Ph.D. in Economics. The Graduate School Old Chemistry Building, room 313 415 Chapel Drive, Box 90065 Durham, NC 27708. [quote] You may even say that there's no reason for anyone to attend a PhD program out of the top ten because you got in everywhere you applied with only a 3.4.

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Also where did this Caltech student apply to? This means that for every 100 students who applied, 6 students were admitted, making MIT's admissions process highly competitive. It's possible that there might be a time lag between increase in supply and increase in demand - if increase in supply comes first, then these programs might be easier to get into - but it's the opposite if increase in demand comes first.

. Check the number of rejected stduents in physics and compare that to other science fields. MIT Graduate Admissions Statement June 11, 2020. I'm really not sure if you can say that Physics is harder to get in than other natural sciences and softer sciences though (how does it compare to chemistry, for example?). In the past 80 years, our department has guided over 600 PhD candidates to success. Guy with 3.3 overall GPA and 850 PGRE got into Astrophysics at Cornell and Penn State (waitlisted at Columbia) - Penn State has a VERY high ranking for astrophysics.

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Just on this site. American Institute of Physics, Contact us Graduate School Acceptance Rate: 60% (some programs may be different) Founded in 1870, Loyola University of Chicago is one of the nation’s largest Jesuit, Catholic Universities and the only one located in Chicago. To be admitted into the graduate program, a student must hold a bachelor’s degree or its equivalent from an accredited college or university. [quote] For some reason, all the "hardcore theory" guys all want to do pure math (or computer science or applied math), so this frees up the more theoretical parts of the sciences for the rest of us. You see people with 3.3s getting into top biology programs. Especially if you want full support/funding. His reason: Poor PGRE. University of St Andrews acceptance rates and statistics for PhD Physics for the years 2017, 2018 and 2019. No, we only offer a Ph.D. How do I apply? If you're set on doing an EECS PhD, MIT's a pretty damn good place to do it -- you're liable to be working with top people on top research, and you should end up with excellent connections for your field. © Also the average GPA for bioscience students at a lot of top 10 programs is around 3.5

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Also you posted on thegradcafe.com right? Your application in physics at top 40 schools get tossed lol

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Examine the statistics. This requirement is waived if the candidate attended a secondary school taught in English and should be noted as such in the Test Scores/Experience section. Too much is subjective. Some departments require a doctoral candidate to take a “minor” program outside of the principal field. But if you don't have much research, or don't have a solid bio/math/computer combination background, you might find admissions extremely competitive, even with a 4.0. Mine is going to be more centered around infectious disease (I hope), but, I've got a background in enzyme kinetics, protein chemistry, biophysics, and tissue culturing. Reliable data, properly contextualized, can help people understand complex systems and make informed decisions.So, a few years ago, we began publishing our own admissions statistics which went beyond the stats already contributed to the MIT… And also, a field that advisers generally don't recommend people to go into. Where is that? Thus they can only support a few, top students.

. The key to that: a high PGRE score paired up with research. The deadline for submitting completed appl… It says that physics isn't a particularly popular field for people, so it isn't that competitive.

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My impression is that astrophysics, physics, computational biology, and the computational/theoretical parts of many other sciences have the least competitive programs. In addition, a professor in a theoretical area is only going to want to bother with students who demonstrate enormous capability, because otherwise they will be eat up the scarce funding and not contribute anything (whereas in more applied areas they can still do grunt work in the worst case). The doctorate normally requires the full-time concentration of the student for a minimum of four years. If you are a molecular biology student with extensive math and computer training and solid research experience, you might find admission to top programs easy, even though your GPA was a 3.4. Well, it's much easier to get research with a theoretical/computational biologist than it is to get with a regular biologist (especially one in the health sciences). However, this is because humanities receive even less funding (you can think of them as even more theoretical than theoretical sciences, because there is very little concrete gain). This document describes the doctoral program in the Physics Department.

physics>chemistry> biology in terms of difficulty of getting in. The best 40 or so programs are federally funded. Graduate students entering the Department have had a wide variety of major background preparation, varying from literature to physics. School name Department Acceptance rate Number applied

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Just apply to the programs that promise to challenge you and that fit with your research interests. So it's probably unrepresentative.

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But if computational biology is quickly expanding, then doesn't it mean that more and more slots are being created for it?

, I am not a physicist by the way- just pointing out what I have seen from general observation. That was the only one with the combo I could find so far.

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EDIT: looked for more, almost no more examples. mydate = new Date(); Maybe the guys with 3.3s had PHENOMENAL research.

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And yes, people with 3.3s DO get into physics grad programs, and it's actually not uncommon. You see people with 3.3s getting into top biology programs. I actually pursued theoretical biology research first, but screwed up my opportunities (due to immaturity) and astronomy professors are more forgiving, so I went into astronomy.

, Powered by Discourse, best viewed with JavaScript enabled. For students applying to the class of 2023, out of 21,312 applicants, MIT admitted 1,410. I'm really only concerned about relative acceptance rates.

. The requirements for a PhD in Physics at MIT are the doctoral examination, a few required subject classes, and a research-based thesis.

Do you offer a master’s degree? It supplements the Graduate Policies and Procedures, which outlines the general Institute requirements and is available on the web at https://oge.mit.edu/gpp/.. But that's also because you're not competing with the premeds (who will just apply for med schools).

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As for the computational biology field though, I'm relying on hearsay from someone I know from another forum.

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The application website will be available on September 15 for students who wish to apply to enter the graduate program the following September. Applying to UC Berkeley's Physics Graduate ProgramThe application deadline for Fall 2021 admission to the Berkeley Physics Ph.D. program is:December 15, 2020 at 8:59 PM (Pacific Standard Time)/11:59 PM (Eastern Standard Time)Your application should be complete -- meaning that all of your letters and supplemental materials should be uploaded -- by this deadline. Maybe social sciences are easier to get in WITHOUT funding, but I'm talking about getting in with the case of funding. Graduate Program. Formal requirements are limited in number. [quote] year = myyear; Note: Click on column header to sort. The majority of our MS graduates have gone on to residency or clinical physics positions. What are the requirements to complete a PhD? Among our graduates who have gone on to residency over the past decade, ~2/3 have been MS students. myyear= mydate.getFullYear(); The PhD and ScD degrees are awarded interchangeably by all departments in the School of Engineering and the School of Science except in the fields of biology, cognitive science, neuroscience, medical engineering, and medical physics. The selection of the Ph.D. students admitted to the Department of Physics is based on an individualized, holistic review of each application, including (but not limited to) the student's academic record, the letters of recommendation, the statement of purpose, past accomplishments, and talent for research in physics. It is not essential that the undergraduate degree be in economics. Can you name one top-level interdisciplinary program with an acceptance rate that's at least 30%? Okay, you have me convinced.

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I've read thegradcafe results before - but it's sort of frustrating because you can't see the stats of the applicant (why do they do this when they don't even post their GPAs+GRE scores? Official transcripts should be scanned and uploaded to your online application. var year=""; I can assure you that kids get into top bioscience programs with 3.5 GPAs which would be mediocre in physics. Check previous sites. )

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Wait though, do SOME bioscience programs have higher average GPAs than others? document.write(year); And how are interdisciplinary fields easier to get in? I'd really appreciate it. The doctoral examination consists of a written and an oral examination. Several people get their PhD part in Public Health, or alternatively is something as different as a social science.

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They take between 6 and 9 years, usually about 7. Like lower than 60th percentile?

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I know a Caltech student who had an AMAZING GPA and AMAZING research, and still got rejected nearly everywhere. Just on this site. I really only have time for the PGRE at this point.

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It's also possible that lack of analytical ability is one of the main bottlenecks to a lot of bioscience research (just as lack of programming ability is the main bottleneck to astronomy research).

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Which bioscience fields are most willing to take someone with a pure math+physics major who doesn't even have organic chemistry?

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Still though, I'd really appreciate data on acceptance rates, since universities won't reply to my emails if I ask them for that data.

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I'm really interested. The difficulty of admission in a graduate program is driven by funding as much as it is driven by competition.

Oh okay. In addition, other graduate programs in the social sciences, humanities, management, architecture, and urban studies have gained significant prominence. But that doesn't necessarily make it harder to get into, for someone who probably already has that intelligence.

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A physics PhD>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Chemistry/Biology/Biochemistry

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In difficulty. While top math PhD programs enrollment are roughly 20/r, … MIT's Department of Mechanical Engineering (MechE) offers a world-class education that combines thorough analysis with hands-on discovery. We love data at MIT. Furthermore, they are cheap (because you don't need huge $$ for labs) and in relatively high demand.

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I'm particularly interested in the theoretical/computational astrophysics. Well the best of the best want the whole package-grades, test scores and research experience.

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Yeah, he had lower than 60th percentile. A physics PhD>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Chemistry/Biology/Biochemistry

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In difficulty. Of the ones that don't require advanced GREs, do they have higher average GPAs? MIT has been a consistent national leader in the number of master’s and doctoral degrees awarded, and ranks highly in the sciences and engineering. The average GPA of admitted applicants was 4.13, the average ACT score was 34, and the average SAT score was 1540.Students who took the ACT, the 25th percentile score of successful applicants was 34, and the 75th percentile score was 35.For students who took the SAT, the 25th percentile score was 1500.

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But you might be right actually. Sure, a physics PhD might require more raw intelligence than a PhD in another program.

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Likewise, there might not be many (relatively speaking) students interested in astrophysics. Computational Biology and Bioinformatics programs are very competitive to get into as this field is in demand and and also the competition is fierce: you are competing against bio, comp sci, and math students for the spots in these programs. Meanwhile, some top level physics and astrophysics departments DO have surprisingly high acceptance rates of over 25% (and these departments are the only ones where I can get reliable acceptance rates since a lot of them post them at gradschoolshopper.com).

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Sure, a physics PhD might require more raw intelligence than a PhD in another program. You don't need to be a genius to answer the questions. You must provide one uploaded copy of the official academic transcript from each college you have attended. In this case, the doctoral program is clearly tougher to get into than the master’s program. 3.5 GPAs aren't bad for physics if they're combined with research+excellent PGRE scores. IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT! I have a math+physics+astro triple major and lots of statistics and programming experience. But I also love theoretical biology and atmospheric sciences.

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I am curious as to where you get your information on Computational Biology and other related fields being easy to get into... these fields are actually very hot right now and extremely fast growing. Or theoretical biology. They just convince themselves that their coursework is sufficient enough and put off studying.

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Physics might be more "difficult" in terms of the % of students smart enough to do the thing. :)

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Okay I'm looking through the profiles now. Plus, the school has an alumni network of more than 150,000 around the world. However, this is because humanities receive even less funding (you can think of them as even more theoretical than theoretical sciences, because there is very little concrete gain). He didn't even bother to study for it. It's generally easier to get into a master's program than a PhD program, at MIT or at any other top science or engineering graduate program. Maybe biology programs are easier to get in for people at the 90th percentile of intelligence. *The Master's Degree in Physics is available in special cases only (e.g., US military officers).

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I don't know, but most people seem horridly under-prepared for the Physics GRE simply because there are no reliable prep books available. I don't consider myself a genius either - genius isn't even required to succeed at upper-level physics coursework. Which PhD programs have the highest acceptance rates? In recognition of the significant disruptions caused by Covid-19, specifically the challenges of finding a practical testing site and date, the MIT Physics Department is not accepting Physics GRE or General GRE scores for applications received by the December 15, 2020 deadline for the academic year starting in 2021. It's true that humanities programs are more competitive (percentage-wise) than science, as the post you links points out. But again, if you're smart enough, physics actually isn't any more difficult than other courses. // --> Some will find admissions "easy" while others will think it "nearly impossible," and it all depends on subtle, and sometimes not-so-subtle, aspects of the applicant's background. University of Cambridge acceptance rates and statistics for PhD Physics for the years 2014, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020. But nowadays, lots of theoretical research is now computational, so mediocre students can at least do grunt work in the worst case (by coding programs). Likely biology is based more on research than actual grades, but still some people with amazing physics research have problem cracking top 10 schools. Let's take computational biology, as was discussed above. I spent the past summer in an NSF funded program for Computational Biology and it had a 4% acceptance rate.

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Most of this reasoning is unconvincing. University of Manchester acceptance rates and statistics for PhD Physics for the years 2015, 2016 and 2017. I know fairly mediocre kids with high PGRE scores.

In my opinion I think pure math, econ, and certain humanities programs (i.e Philosophy) are the toughest for admissions, followed by CS and Physics, followed by other natural sciences, followed by softer sciences and interdisciplinary fields. (Also, fewer professors!) Then go through the biosciences chances site. During the 2018-19 admissions cycle, MIT had an acceptance rate of 6.7%. Graduate Admissions Requirements. Applicants should keep in mind that attributes such as

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I know a Caltech student who had an AMAZING GPA and AMAZING research, and still got rejected nearly everywhere. I know I'm not focused, because I equally love astronomy and systems biology (well, I pretty much love everything academic). So you can imagine it some pretty wide fields. Probably top 10-20 programs.Knowing students from Caltech, they woudl expect to get a PhD at the best of the best. In addition, a professor in a theoretical area is only going to want to bother with students who demonstrate enormous capability, because otherwise they will be eat up the scarce funding and not contribute anything (whereas in more applied areas they can still do grunt work in the worst case). Check previous sites. I can assure you that kids get into top bioscience programs with 3.5 GPAs which would be mediocre in physics.

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I am not a physicist by the way- just pointing out what I have seen from general observation. The best thing about them is that unlike regular medical school which costs 50,000 a year or so, these pay you 30,000 a year for whole time you are there. The key to that: a high PGRE score paired up with research. In 2012, we again modified the graduate program, replacing half of the course requirements and all qualifying exams … The low GPA + high PGRE(>850ish) + domestic + did actual major in physics combo is VERY rare on the forums (I guess more conscientious people tend to post their profiles more, which is funny, since forums also tend to attract lots of easily-distracted people/INTPs/people with ADD/[people who can really only learn for once and for all when they screw-up and thus learn after getting mistakes on tests], but I guess I'm the only one).

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But a guy with a 3.5 did get into Berkeley and Columbia for physics. [quote] You could also check the results page. I don't have more bio courses since I really do NOT want to go through my university's intro biology sequence (I did self-study it though, and I self-study massive amounts of biology), and thus, I don't have the pre-reqs for most of them. If you're smart enough (you don't have to be a genius), Caltech is actually the easiest top school to get into, simply because its admissions process is more straightforward (in terms of what it expects out of students) than others.

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Anyways, this does get into subjective territory. I have a few advanced math bio courses and a senior-level synthetic biology course (and a grad lvl neurobiology course that I got a 3.7 in). The time to receive a PhD (from the beginning of the first semester at JHU to filing of the thesis to JHU library after the defense) has been steadily declining. Bottom line: your PhD experience, no matter where you go, is going to be primarily about you and your advisor. That's a very hot field, with an accompanying demand for students since the funding levels tend to be high. Sort by: Acceptance Rate. Yes, there's a lot of money in the field, but there are also a lot of students who are interested in it. School …

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It's true that humanities programs are more competitive (percentage-wise) than science, as the post you links points out.